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Voiceless labiodental fricative

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Title: Voiceless labiodental fricative  
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Subject: Modern Hebrew phonology, Begadkefat, Digraph (orthography), Egyptian Arabic phonology, Tiberian Hebrew
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Voiceless labiodental fricative

Voiceless labiodental fricative
f
IPA number 128
Encoding
Entity (decimal) f
Unicode (hex) U+0066
X-SAMPA f
Kirshenbaum f
Braille ⠋ (braille pattern dots-124)
Sound
 ·

The voiceless labiodental fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in a number of spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is f.

Contents

  • Features 1
  • Occurrence 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • Bibliography 5

Features

Features of the voiceless labiodental fricative:

  • Its manner of articulation is fricative, which means it is produced by constricting air flow through a narrow channel at the place of articulation, causing turbulence.
  • Its place of articulation is labiodental, which means it is articulated with the lower lip and the upper teeth.
  • Its phonation is voiceless, which means it is produced without vibrations of the vocal cords. In some languages the vocal cords are actively separated, so it is always voiceless; in others the cords are lax, so that it may take on the voicing of adjacent sounds.
  • It is an oral consonant, which means air is allowed to escape through the mouth only.
  • Because the sound is not produced with airflow over the tongue, the centrallateral dichotomy does not apply.
  • The airstream mechanism is pulmonic, which means it is articulated by pushing air solely with the lungs and diaphragm, as in most sounds.

Occurrence

Language Word IPA Meaning Notes
Abkhaz фы [fə] 'lightning' See Abkhaz phonology
Adyghe тфы     'five' Corresponds to [xʷ] in Kabardian and Proto-Circassian
Albanian faqe [facɛ] 'cheek'
Arabic Standard[1] ظرف [ðˤɑrf] 'envelope' See Arabic phonology
Armenian Eastern[2] ֆուտբոլ     'football'
Basque fin [fin] 'thin'
Catalan[3] fase [ˈfazə] 'phase' See Catalan phonology
Chechen факс / faks [faks] 'fax'
Chinese Cantonese /fat6 [fɐt˨] 'Buddha' See Cantonese phonology
Mandarin fēi [feɪ̯˥] 'to fly' See Mandarin phonology
Coptic ϥⲧⲟⲟⲩ [ftow] 'four'
Czech foukat [foʊ̯kat] 'to blow' See Czech phonology
Dutch[4] fiets [fits] 'bike' See Dutch phonology
English All dialects fill [fɪl] 'fill' See English phonology
Cockney[5] think [fɪŋk] 'think' Socially marked,[6] with speakers exhibiting some free variation with [θ] (with which it corresponds to in other dialects).[7] See th-fronting.
Many British urban dialects[8]
Some younger New Zealanders[9][10]
Broad South African[11] More common word-finally.
Ewe[12] eflen [éflé̃] 'he spit off'
French[13] fabuleuse [fabyløz] 'fabulous' See French phonology
Galician faísca [faˈiska] 'spark'
German fade [faːdə] 'insipid' See German phonology
Goemai [fat] 'to blow'
Greek φύση fysī [ˈfisi] 'nature' See Modern Greek phonology
Gujarati /faļ [fəɭ] 'fruit' See Gujarati phonology
Hebrew סופר [so̞fe̞ʁ] 'writer' See Modern Hebrew phonology
Hindi साफ़ [sɑːf] 'clean' See Hindustani phonology
Hungarian figyel [fiɟɛl] 'he/she pays attention' See Hungarian phonology
Italian fantasma [fanˈta.zma] 'ghost' See Italian phonology
Kabardian фыз [fəz] 'woman' Corresponds to [ʂʷ] in Adyghe and Proto-Circassian
Kabyle afus [afus] 'hand'
Macedonian фонетика [fɔnetika] 'phonetics' See Macedonian phonology
Malay feri [feri] 'ferry'
Maltese fenek [fenek] 'rabbit'
Norwegian filter [filtɛɾ] 'filter' See Norwegian phonology
Polish[14] futro     'fur' See Polish phonology
Portuguese[15] fogo [ˈfoɡʊ] 'fire' See Portuguese phonology
Punjabi ਫ਼ੌਜੀ [fɔːd͡ʒi] 'soldier'
Romanian[16] foc [fo̞k] 'fire' See Romanian phonology
Russian[17] орфография [ɐrfɐˈɡrafʲɪjə] 'orthography' Contrasts with palatalized form. See Russian phonology
Slovak fúkať [fuːkac] 'to blow'
Somali feex [fɛħ] 'wart' See Somali phonology
Spanish[18] fantasma [fã̈n̪ˈt̪äzmä] 'ghost' See Spanish phonology
Swedish fisk [ˈfɪsk] 'fish' See Swedish phonology
Turkish saf [säf] 'pure' See Turkish phonology
Ukrainian Фастів [ˈfɑ.sʲtʲiw] 'Fastiv' See Ukrainian phonology
Urdu صاف [sɑːf] 'clean' See Hindustani phonology
Vietnamese[19] pháo [faːw˧ˀ˥] 'firecracker' See Vietnamese phonology
Welsh ffon [fɔn] 'stick' See Welsh phonology
West Frisian fol [foɫ] 'full'
Yi /fu [fu˧] 'roast'
Zapotec Tilquiapan[20] cafe [kafɘ] 'coffee' Used primarily in loanwords from Spanish

See also

References

  1. ^ Thelwall (1990:37)
  2. ^ Dum-Tragut (2009:18)
  3. ^ Carbonell & Llisterri (1992:53)
  4. ^ Gussenhoven (1992:45)
  5. ^ Wells (1982), p. 328.
  6. ^ Altendorf (1999), p. 7.
  7. ^ Clark & Trousdale (2010), p. 309.
  8. ^ Britain (2005), p. 1005.
  9. ^ Wood (2003), p. 50.
  10. ^ Gordon & Maclagan (2008), p. 74.
  11. ^ Bowerman (2004), p. 939.
  12. ^ Ladefoged (2005:156)
  13. ^ Fougeron & Smith (1993:73)
  14. ^ Jassem (2003:103)
  15. ^ Cruz-Ferreira (1995:91)
  16. ^ DEX Online : [2]
  17. ^ Padgett (2003:42)
  18. ^ Martínez-Celdrán et al. (2003:255)
  19. ^ Thompson (1959:458–461)
  20. ^ Merrill (2008:109)

Bibliography

  • Altendorf, Ulrike; Watt, Dominik (2004), "The dialects in the South of England: phonology", in Schneider, Edgar W.; Burridge, Kate; Kortmann, Bernd; Mesthrie, Rajend; Upton, Clive, A handbook of varieties of English, 1: Phonology, Mouton de Gruyter, pp. 181–196,  
  • Bowerman, Sean (2004), "White South African English: phonology", in Schneider, Edgar W.; Burridge, Kate; Kortmann, Bernd; Mesthrie, Rajend; Upton, Clive, A handbook of varieties of English, 1: Phonology, Mouton de Gruyter, pp. 931–942,  
  • Britain, David (2005), "Innovation diffusion: "Estuary English" and local dialect differentiation: The survival of Fenland Englishes", Linguistics 43 (5): 995–1022 
  • Carbonell, Joan F.; Llisterri, Joaquim (1992), "Catalan", Journal of the International Phonetic Association 22 (1–2): 53–56,  
  • Clark, Lynn; Trousdale, Graeme (2010), "A cognitive approach to quantitative sociolinguistic variation: Evidence from th-fronting in Central Scotland", in Geeraerts, Dirk; Kristiansen, Gitte; Peirsman, Yves, Advances in Cognitive Linguistics, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter,  
  • Cruz-Ferreira, Madalena (1995), "European Portuguese", Journal of the International Phonetic Association 25 (2): 90–94,  
  • Dum-Tragut, Jasmine (2009), Armenian: Modern Eastern Armenian, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company 
  • Fougeron, Cecile; Smith, Caroline L (1993), "Illustrations of the IPA:French", Journal of the International Phonetic Association 23 (2): 73–76,  
  • Gordon, Elizabeth; Maclagan, Margaret (2008), "Regional and social differences in New Zealand: Phonology", in Burridge, Kate; Kortmann, Bernd, Varieties of English, 3: The Pacific and Australasia, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, pp. 64–76,  
  • Gussenhoven, Carlos (1992), "Dutch", Journal of the International Phonetic Association 22 (2): 45–47,  
  • Jassem, Wiktor (2003), "Polish", Journal of the International Phonetic Association 33 (1): 103–107,  
  •  
  • Martínez-Celdrán, Eugenio; Fernández-Planas, Ana Ma.; Carrera-Sabaté, Josefina (2003), "Castilian Spanish", Journal of the International Phonetic Association 33 (2): 255–259,  
  • Merrill, Elizabeth (2008), "Tilquiapan Zapotec", Journal of the International Phonetic Association 38 (1): 107–114,  
  • Padgett, Jaye (2003), "Contrast and Post-Velar Fronting in Russian", Natural Language & Linguistic Theory 21 (1): 39–87,  
  • Rogers, Derek; d'Arcangeli, Luciana (2004), "Italian", Journal of the International Phonetic Association 34 (1): 117–121,  
  • Thompson, Laurence (1959), "Saigon phonemics", Language 35 (3): 454–476,  
  • Thelwall, Robin (1990), "Illustrations of the IPA: Arabic", Journal of the International Phonetic Association 20 (2): 37–41,  
  •  
  • Wood, Elizabeth (2003), "TH-fronting: The substitution of f/v for θ/ð in New Zealand English", New Zealand English Journal 17: 50–56 
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