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Pasture

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Title: Pasture  
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Pasture

A pasture in the East Riding of Yorkshire in England

Pasture (from the Latin pastus, past participle of pascere, "to feed") is land used for grazing.[1]

Pasture lands in the narrow sense are enclosed tracts of farmland, grazed by domesticated livestock, such as horses, cattle, sheep or swine. The vegetation of tended pasture, forage, consists mainly of grasses, with an interspersion of legumes and other forbs (non-grass herbaceous plants). Pasture is typically grazed throughout the summer, in contrast to meadow which is ungrazed or used for grazing only after being mown to make hay for animal fodder.[2] Pasture in a wider sense additionally includes rangelands, other unenclosed pastoral systems, and land types used by wild animals for grazing or browsing.

Pasture lands in the narrow sense are distinguished from rangelands by being managed through more intensive agricultural practices of seeding, irrigation, and the use of fertilizers, while rangelands grow primarily native vegetation, managed with extensive practices like controlled burning and regulated intensity of grazing.

Soil type, minimum annual temperature, and rainfall are important factors in pasture management. Sheepwalk is an area of grassland where sheep can roam freely. The productivity of sheepwalk is measured by the number of sheep per area. This is dependent, among other things, on the underlying rock.[3] Sheepwalk is also the name of townlands in County Roscommon, Ireland and County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland.

Unless evolution and metabolism of particular animals, and their fertilising and tending of the land may over generations result in the pasture combined with the ruminants in question being integral to a particular ecosystem.[4]

Examples of pasture habitats

Snowy pasture at Bosco Chiesanuova in Italy
Grazing cattle on a pasture near Hradec nad Moravicí in the Czech Republic

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Merriam-Webster Dictionary pasture
  2. ^  "Pasture".  
  3. ^ R. Elfyn Hughes, "Sheep Population and Environment in Snowdonia (North Wales)", Journal of Ecology Vol. 46, No. 1, Mar., 1958, 169-189
  4. ^ "Agricultural biodiversity’s contribution to ecosystem functions" Dr. Devra I. Jarvis, CGIAR. Retrieved 2014-12-01


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