World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Minister of the Interior (France)

Article Id: WHEBN0000871703
Reproduction Date:

Title: Minister of the Interior (France)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: 2005 French riots, Pierre Joxe, Nicolas Sarkozy, Bernard Cazeneuve, Manuel Valls
Collection: French Interior Ministers, Government Ministries of France
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Minister of the Interior (France)

The entrance to the Ministry in Place Beauvau is guarded by one gendarme (left) and one policewoman (right). Joint gendarmerie/police guard duty was seen as a way to bridge the differences between the services.

The Minister of the Interior (French: Ministre de l'Intérieur, French pronunciation: ​) in France is one of the most important French government cabinet positions.[1]

Contents

  • Responsibilities 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Responsibilities

The Minister of the Interior is responsible for the following:

The Minister of Interior is also Ministre des cultes and is formally consulted in the process of appointment of Catholic diocesan bishops (Briand-Ceretti Agreement).

While the ministry of the Interior supervises police forces, it does not supervise criminal enquiries; criminal enquiries are conducted under the supervision of the judiciary.

The Ministry's headquarters are located on the place Beauvau, facing the Élysée Palace. "Place Beauvau" is often used as a metonym for the ministry.

The current Minister of the Interior is Bernard Cazeneuve.

See also

References

  1. ^ It is equivalent to the Interior Ministry of other countries, the Home Office of the United Kingdom, or similar to a combination of the FBI and Homeland Security (United States).

External links

  • Official Website in French
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.