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Espoo

Espoo
EspooEsbo
Town
Espoon kaupunki
Esbo stad
Skyline of Espoo
Skyline of Espoo
Coat of arms of Espoo
Coat of arms
Official logo of Espoo
Logo
Location of Espoo in Finland
Location of Espoo in Finland
Coordinates:
Country Finland
Region Uusimaa
Sub-region Greater Helsinki
Charter 1458
City 1972
Government
 • City manager Jukka Mäkelä
Area (2011-01-01)[1]
 • Total 528.14 km2 (203.92 sq mi)
 • Land 312.26 km2 (120.56 sq mi)
 • Water 215.88 km2 (83.35 sq mi)
Area rank 221st largest in Finland
Population (2014-09-30)[2]
 • Total 264,464
 • Rank 2nd largest in Finland
 • Density 846.94/km2 (2,193.6/sq mi)
Population by native language[3]
 • Finnish 83.6% (official)
 • Swedish 8.3% (official)
 • Others 8%
Population by age[4]
 • 0 to 14 19.7%
 • 15 to 64 69.8%
 • 65 or older 10.5%
Time zone EET (UTC+2)
 • Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3)
Municipal tax rate[5] 17.75%
Website www.espoo.fi
The 55 districts of Espoo

Espoo (Finnish pronunciation: ; Swedish: Esbo, ) is the second largest city and municipality in Finland. The population of the city of Espoo is 264 464.[6] It is part of the Capital region and most of its population lives in the inner urban core of the Helsinki metropolitan area, along with the cities of Helsinki, Vantaa, and Kauniainen. Espoo shares its eastern border with Helsinki and Vantaa, while enclosing Kauniainen. The city is on the shore of the Gulf of Finland, in the region of Uusimaa.

Other bordering municipalities of Espoo are Nurmijärvi and Vihti in the north and Kirkkonummi in the west. The national park of Nuuksio is situated in northwest Espoo.

Espoo encompasses 528 square kilometres (204 sq mi), of which 312 km2 (120 sq mi) is land.[1]

Espoo has several local regional centers. Espoo is thus divided into seven major areas (Finnish: suuralueet, Swedish: storområden): Vanha-Espoo (with administrative center), Suur-Espoonlahti, Pohjois-Espoo, Suur-Kauklahti, Suur-Leppävaara, Suur-Matinkylä and Suur-Tapiola.

VTT – the Technical Research Center of Finland. Several major companies are based in Espoo, including Nokia Solutions and Networks, Microsoft Mobile, KONE, Neste Oil, Fortum, Orion Corporation and Outokumpu as well as video game developers Rovio and Remedy Entertainment.

The city of Espoo is officially bilingual. The majority of the population, 83.6%, speaks Finnish as their mother tongue, while a minority of 8.3% speaks Swedish. 8% of Espoo's population has a first language other than Finnish or Swedish.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Name 2
  • Demographics 3
  • Politics 4
  • Culture 5
  • Sports 6
  • Gallery 7
    • Twin towns – Sister cities 7.1
  • See also 8
  • References 9
  • External links 10

History

The first inhabitants in the area arrived about 9,000 years ago. Physical evidence (pollen grains) indicates agriculture from ca. 1000 AD, but there are no historical records. Up to the 13th century, the area was a borderland between the hunting grounds of Finnish Proper and Tavastian Finns, with a sparse population. Viipuri.

In 1557, King Gustaf Wasa decided to stabilize and develop the region by founding a royal mansion in Espoo. The government bought the villages of Espåby and Mankby (Finnish: Mankki) and transferred the population elsewhere, and built the royal mansion in Espåby. (Mankby was eventually abandoned and was never repopulated.) The royal mansion housed the king's local plenipotentiary (vogt), and collected royal tax in kind paid by labor on the mansion's farm. The administrative center Espoon keskus has grown around the church and the Espoo railway station, but the municipality has retained a network-like structure of to the modern day.

In 1920, Espoo was only a rural municipality of about 9,000 inhabitants, of whom 70% were Swedish speaking. Agriculture was the primary source of income, with 75% of the population making their living from farming. Kauniainen was separated from Espoo in 1920, and it gained city rights the same year as Espoo, in 1972.

Espoo started to grow rapidly in the 1940s and '50s. It quickly developed from a rural municipality into a fully-fledged industrial city, gaining city rights in 1972. Due to its proximity to Helsinki, Espoo soon became popular amongst people working in the capital. In the fifty years from 1950 to 2000, the population of Espoo grew from 22,000 to 210,000. Since 1945, the majority of people in Espoo have been Finnish speaking. In 2006, the Swedish speaking inhabitants represented barely 9% of the total population. The population growth is still continuing, but at a slower rate.

Name

The name Espoo probably comes from the Swedish name for the River Espoo, Espå (or Espåå), which in turn comes from the old Swedish word äspe, meaning a border of aspen, and the Swedish word for "river", å, thus "a river bordered by aspen". The name was first mentioned in 1431. The banks of the River Espoo are even today populated heavily with aspen.

Demographics

Historical population of Espoo[7]
Year Population Year Population
1901 5,888 1985 156,778
1910 7,891 1990 172,629
1920 8,817 1995 191,247
1930 11,370 2000 213,271
1940 13,378 2005 231,704
1950 22,878 2010 247,970
1960 53,042 2013 260,753
1970 92,655 2020 (est.) 281,970
1975 120,632 2030 (est.) 306,965
1980 137,409 2040 (est.) 323,875
Population by grand district (in 2006)
Area Population Area Population
Leppävaara 58,048 Vanha-Espoo 33,613
Espoonlahti 48,649 Pohjois-Espoo 9,754
Tapiola 41,905 Kauklahti 6,191
Matinkylä 33,613

The population by nationality 1 January 2007 was 95.1% Finnish and 4.9% other nationalities. Religious affiliation was 77.4% Lutheran, 1.3% Orthodox, 1.3% other, 19.9% no religious affiliation.

Espoo contains many high income suburbs, and six out of the ten highest average income postal code areas in Finland are in Espoo.

Politics

Results of the Finnish parliamentary election, 2011 in Espoo:

Espoo's city council has 75 members. Following the municipal election of 2012 the council seats are allocated in the following way: National Coalition Party 29 seats, Greens 13, Social Democrats 10, True Finns 10, Swedish People's Party 7, Centre Party 2, Left Alliance 2, Christian Democrats 2.[8]

Culture

Espoo hosts a Museum of Modern Art called EMMA (Espoo Museum of Modern Art), built in a renovated old print house, the WeeGee house, named after an old book print company Weilin & Göös. The same building hosts also Finland's only Museum of Horology (Finnish: Kellomuseo, Swedish: Urmuseum) and a Toy Museum. Glims Farmstead Museum is also located in the city. The Espoo cultural centre, where numerous concerts and theater performances are held, is located in Tapiola (Swedish: Hagalund).

Espoo has several manors two of which are open to the public. The most important is Espoon kartano (Swedish: Esbo gård, Espoo Manor), mentioned first time in 1495, and belonging to the noble Ramsay family since 1756. The current main building dates from 1914, but a mill dates from the 1750s and Finland oldest walved stone bridge from 1777 is on the King's Road (Finnish: Kuninkaantie, Swedish: Kungsvägen) which passes by the manor. The main building can be rented for weddings and similar occasions. Guided tours on request for groups. The other manor open to public is Pakankylän kartano, located on the northern shore of Lake Bodom. The manor hosts a restaurant and club rooms, partly with original furniture open to the public, but meant original to Kaisankoti sanatory and old people's home located on ground of the manor.

The Metal band Children of Bodom comes from Espoo, Finland. They are named after the unsolved murder known as the Lake Bodom murders which took place at Lake Bodom, a lake in northern Espoo in 1960. The bands Norther and Kiuas also come from Espoo.

The educational department takes part in Lifelong Learning Programme 2007–2013 in Finland.

Sports

At the 1952 Summer Olympics, the city's Westend Tennis Hall hosted the fencing events.

Espoo is home to several premier league sports teams. The Espoo Blues play at Barona Areena in the SM-liiga – professional ice hockey league. The club was established in February 1984 as "Kiekko-Espoo" and played their first season in 1984–1985 in the Finnish Second Division. In 1988 they achieved a place on the Finnish First Division and in 1992 they celebrated their promotion to the SM-liiga. The club and the team changed their name in 1998. The name came from the dominant colour of their home jersey. The full name of the club is Blues Hockey Oy.

The Blues are a contender for the title almost every year, but have yet to win the series. They have come second several times though, most recently in 2011.

Another sports club from Espoo, FC Honka, is a football club based in Tapiola in southern Espoo. It was promoted into the Finnish premier division (Veikkausliiga) for the first time in its history at the end of the 2005 season. The manager of the club is Mika Lehkosuo, and it plays its home matches at Tapiolan urheilupuisto. Originally founded in 1953 as "Tapion Honka", it changed its name into FC Honka in 1975.

FC Honka is largely known in Finland for its extensive youth scheme with over 1000 young players playing in various age groups.

Espoo is the birthplace of 2007 Formula One World Champion Kimi Räikkönen, former Dallas Stars forward Jere Lehtinen (three time NHL Selke Trophy winner), former Formula One driver JJ Lehto, professional downhill mountain biker Matti Lehikoinen, professional ten-pin bowling star Osku Palermaa and 2009 European Figure Skating Champion Laura Lepistö.
Club Sport League Stadium Logo
FC Honka Football Veikkausliiga Tapiolan urheilupuisto
Espoo Blues Ice hockey SM-liiga Barona Areena
Espoo Blues Ice hockey Women's SM series Laaksolahti Arena Blues logo
Espoon Oilers Floorball Salibandyliiga Tapiolan urheiluhalli Honkalogo

Gallery

Twin towns – Sister cities

Espoo is twinned with:[9]

Nuuksio National Park in the autumn

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ a b "Area by municipality as of 1 January 2011" (PDF) (in Finnish and Swedish). Land Survey of Finland. Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  2. ^ "VÄESTÖTIETOJÄRJESTELMÄ REKISTERITILANNE 30.09.2014" (in Finnish and Swedish). Population Register Center of Finland. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  3. ^ "Population according to language and the number of foreigners and land area km2 by area as of 31 December 2008". Statistics Finland's PX-Web databases. Statistics Finland. Retrieved 29 March 2009. 
  4. ^ "Population according to age and gender by area as of 31 December 2008". Statistics Finland's PX-Web databases. Statistics Finland. Retrieved 28 April 2009. 
  5. ^ "List of municipal and parish tax rates in 2011". Tax Administration of Finland. 29 November 2010. Retrieved 13 March 2011. 
  6. ^ http://vrk.fi/default.aspx?docid=8639&site=3&id=0
  7. ^ Tilastokeskus. "Population statistics", Tilastokeskus, Retrieved on 9 June 2014.
  8. ^ "Espoo - Tulospalvelu - Kuntavaalit 2012". Vaalikone.fi. Retrieved 2013-03-26. 
  9. ^ "Twin towns". Espoo. Retrieved 28 April 2014. 
  10. ^ "Interactive City Directory".  

Sources

  • Espoon kaupungin taskutilasto 2007, issued by the City of Espoo, 2007

External links

  • 1952 Summer Olympics official report. p. 50.
  • City of Espoo – Official website (Finnish)
  • City of Espoo (Esbo) – Official website (Swedish)
  • City of Espoo – Official website (English)
  • Visit Espoo Espoo for travellers (Finnish) (Swedish) (English)
  • Helsinki University of Technology – located in Espoo (Finnish) (Swedish) (English)
  • Helsinki.fi – Helsinki region in a nutshell (Finnish) (Swedish) (English)
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