Yasubedin Rastegar Jooybari

Grand Ayatollah Yasubedin Rastegar Jooybari
Born 1940 (1940)
Iran
Religion Twelver Shi'a Islam
Website
www.rastegarejooybari.ir/

Grand Ayatollah Yasubedin Rastegar Jooybari (Persian: يعسوب الدين رستگار جويباري) (born 1940) is an Iranian Twelver Shi'a Marja.[1][2]

He has studied in seminaries of Qom, Iran under Grand Ayatollah Mohammad Kazem Shariatmadari and Mohammad-Reza Golpaygani.[3]

He has repeatedly been arrested for his opposition against the current Iranian government, in particular Supreme Leader Khamenei.

Background

Grand Ayatollah Yasub al-Din Rastgari, accused of criticizing government policies, has been arrested and detained several times. During his arrest in late February 1996, he was held in incommunicado detention, reportedly mainly in Tawhid and Evin Prisons in Tehran until July 1996.

In August 1996, he was sentenced to three years imprisonment for having held a mourning ceremony for the late Grand Ayatollah Shariatmadari. He was sentenced by the Special Clerical Court after a summary trial on vaguely worded charges, in which he had no access to a lawyer.

Grand Ayatollah Rastgari was released from prison in December 1996, but immediately afterwards was placed under house arrest in Qom.[4] Rastgari was again arrested on April 27, 2004 and sentenced by the Special Clerical Court to four years in prison for “insulting Islam” and “causing schism” through his book, The Reality of Religious Unity. He has reportedly been tortured while in detention and is held incommunicado without access to his family.

His two sons were arrested with him at the time. After publishing Rastgari's book "The Reality of Religious Unity," the book’s publisher was shut down.[5]

Notes

External links

  • Short biography
  • ISCHRO Calls for the Release of Grand Ayatollah Rastegari
  • عاجل/ رسالة المرجع الرستكاري إلى خامنئي من داخل السجن

See also

Bibliography

Amnesty International Report 13/24/97

Network of Concerned Historians, “Grand Ayatollah Yasub al-Din Rastgari: detained in Iran for publishing a book on Islamic history,” 20.10.2005, http://www.let.rug.nl/nch.

References


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