World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Split album

Article Id: WHEBN0004902477
Reproduction Date:

Title: Split album  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Andrew Harris (musician), Canada (Low song), Excel (band), Split albums, As I Lay Dying/American Tragedy
Collection: Album Types, Split Albums
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Split album

A split album (or split) is a music album which includes tracks by two or more separate artists. There have been singles and EPs of the same variety, which are often called "split singles" and "split EPs" respectively. Split albums differ from "various artists" compilation albums in that they generally include several tracks of each artist, or few artists with one or two tracks each, instead of multiple artists with only one or two tracks each.

History

Splits were initially done on vinyl records, with music from one artist on one side of the record and music from a second artist on the opposite side. As vinyl records have declined in popularity, this has been done on CDs. Although there are not multiple sides to a CD, the idea is still the same. Since the early 1980s, the format has been used widely by independent record labels, and artists in punk rock, hardcore, grindcore, black metal, noise and indie rock circles. Splits usually receive an underground fanbase even if the artists featured are mainstream, as the success of split albums is most often not of a mainstream proportion.

A recent trend is using the same philosophy for getting live shows for emerging music artists. A "split gig" is a show with two artists, one guest and one host.

Advantages

A split allows more than one artist to split the production costs for a release. The same can also apply to the promotional costs of a single release. Splits also allow artists to expose their music directly to another artist's fanbase. Usually, the artists on a split are of a similar musical genre. The artists may also cover each other's songs.


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.