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Hossein Shariatmadari

Hossein Shariatmadari is the managing editor of Kayhan, a conservative Iranian newspaper.

Before the Iranian Revolution in 1979, Shariatmadari was allegedly tortured by Iranian Shah's Police or SAVAK (whose role was later taken by Islamic Republic's SAVAMA).

A strong supporter of president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, he has been described as being "a close confidant of Iran’s supreme leader" Ali Khamenei, and as having "links" to Iran's intelligence services.[1]

On 17 April 2012 Shariatmadari published an editorial in which he stressed Iran's right to enrich uranium to 99%.[2]

Controversies

After the controversial 2009 election and weeks of protest, Shariatmadari wrote an editorial in Kayhan alleging that defeated candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi was trying to "escape punishment for murdering innocent people, holding riots, cooperating with foreigners and acting as America's fifth column inside the country" and called for Mousavi and former reformist President Mohammad Khatami to be tried in court for "horrible crimes and treason."[3]

In 2009, during the first contested presidential elections, Shariatmadari was announced that Mohammad Khatami would risk the same fate of Benazir Bhutto if he was elected. After the elections, alongside the Green Party protests, Shariatmadari accused Mir Hossein Mousavi of being a fifth column of the US and causing the deaths of many people.[4]

References

  1. ^ Worth, Robert F. (June 21, 2009). "Up in Arms, A Struggle for the Legacy of the Iranian Revolution". New York Times. 
  2. ^ "ARRICCHIRE URANIO AL 99% UN DIRITTO DELL’IRAN? - NO PASDARAN". NO PASDARAN. 
  3. ^ Hardliner calls opposition leader US agent. Associated Press, July 4, 2009 accessed 7-July-2009
  4. ^ "Shariatmadari threatens Mousavi, Karroubi and Khatami". iranian.com. 
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